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Such interesting little fellows, these guys… I only have ever seen one at a time, and i havent seen one in a couple weeks. Soon as it warmed up i stopped seeing them. Very cute. Hop on the ground a lot, havent seen one on my feeder yet. only the ground. Adorableeeeee!

*2013 update – These guys have really interesting flight patterns in their wings. also i had five at once yesterday, and they were very aggressive it seemed. *

Dark-eyed Juncos are neat, even flashy little sparrows that flit about forest floors of the western mountains and Canada, then flood the rest of North America for winter. They’re easy to recognize by their crisp (though extremely variable) markings and the bright white tail feathers they habitually flash in flight. One of the most abundant forest birds of North America, you’ll see juncos on woodland walks as well as in flocks at your feeders or on the ground beneath them.

Sparrows
Sparrows
Typical Voice
  • Size & Shape

    The Dark-eyed Junco is a medium-sized sparrow with a rounded head, a short, stout bill and a fairly long, conspicuous tail.

  • Color Pattern

    Juncos vary across the country (see Regional Differences), but in general they’re dark gray or brown birds brightened up by a pink bill and white outer tail feathers that periodically flash open, particularly in flight.

  • Behavior

    Dark-eyed Juncos are birds of the ground. They hop around the bases of trees and shrubs in forests or venture out onto lawns looking for fallen seeds. You’ll often hear their high chip notes, given almost absent-mindedly while foraging, or intensifying as they take short, low flights through cover.

  • Habitat

    Dark-eyed Juncos breed in coniferous or mixed-coniferous forests across Canada, the western U.S., and in the Appalachians. During winter you’ll find them in open woodlands, fields, parks, roadsides, and backyards.

  • Voice:
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